Question: Who Or Whom Are You Waiting For?

Who is VS that is?

Rule: Who refers to people.

That may refer to people, animals, groups, or things, but who is preferred when referring to people.

Example: Anya is the one who rescued the bird.

NOTE: While Anya is the one that rescued the bird is also correct, who is preferred..

Who is example sentences?

Apparently Señor Medena had two children who denied him. How can he remember well his ignorance–which his growth requires–who has so often to use his knowledge? Jonathan glanced up at Alex, who met his gaze sternly. If he knew who Alex really was, he probably knew more than Alex did.

Who are you waiting for passive voice?

Answer: The changed voice of the sentence is “For whom you are waiting for?” Explanation: Passive voice tells the information of what has to be done to something or someone.

Who do I love or whom I love?

Both are correct, but for different reasons. In these interrogative sentences. who/whom is the direct object of the verb love: “You love who/whom.” The rules for formal written English say that the word should be whom, because it is in the objective case. But whom is disappearing from spoken American English.

Are you waiting for me change the voice?

Answer. Am I being waited by you ? Rules for changing voices : => The object of the action sentence becomes the subject of the verb in the passive voice.

Can I know who am I talking to?

May I know whom I am talking to is grammatically incorrect, because whom is not used as a subject, but as the object of a verb or preposition. … May I know who I am talking to is correct because who is the subject here. May I know to whom I am talking is correct because whom is the object of the preposition to here.

Do you understand what I mean change the voice?

Given the sentence is “Do u understand my meaning “ and you identify that the sentence is in what form and then ensure the terms and condition when you come to change in the passive voice. Her e answer is “ is my meaning understood by you “ hope it is right answer that the student can follow and get best ideas of it.

Who I recommend or whom I recommend?

The commonly repeated advice for remembering whether to use who or whom is this: If you can replace the word with he or she or another subject pronoun, use who. If you can replace it with him or her (or another object pronoun), use whom. One way to remember this trick is that both him and whom end with the letter m.

Who I respect or whom I respect?

The Quick Answer: When to Use Who and Whom If a question can be answered with him, the pronoun whom is correct—just remember that both words end with an -m!

Do I use who or whom in this sentence?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

Have they done the work change the voice?

Answer: the work has done by them.

Who I have become or whom I have become?

Rule #1: Substitute “he/him” or “she/her”: If it’s either “he” or “she,” then it’s “who;” if it’s “him” or “her,” then it’s “whom.” “he” (whoever) is the subject of the verb “called.” In the sentence, “Give it to whoever deserves it”:([You] give it to whoever deserves it.)

Who I love dearly or whom I love dearly?

“Them” is the objective case. So you should use also use the objective case of who/whom. Thus: “…, all of whom I love dearly.” (And so that first question should be “whom do I love”.)

Who do you love the most or whom do you love the most?

Perhaps the best and most reliable way to determine whether who or whom is correct is to simply ask and answer a question. Some examples: 1) Who do you love? (Answer: I love him, her or them–all objects.) Therefore, the correct usage would be whom.

Who you trust or whom you trust?

The sentence is correct, however, there is a rule about the use of who versus whom. In formal English, who is used when referring to the subject, while whom is used when referring to the object. So in formal English it would be grammatically better to use whom , since whom is the object of the verb ‘to trust’.

Who are you waiting for meaning?

phrase. If you say to someone ‘What are you waiting for? ‘ you are telling them to hurry up and do something.

Who or whom am I speaking to?

In formal English, “to whom am I speaking” would be correct. “Whom” is the objective form of “who,” and “whom” is the object of the preposition “to” in the sentence “to whom am I speaking?”.

Who or whom should I contact?

It should be “Whom should I contact?” Whom replaces the object of the sentence. The answer to the question would be “I should contact him.” Not “I should contact he.” That’s the easiest way to be sure of whether to use who or whom. If it can be replaced with he, use who.